Summit Up 7-16-10: Standing up for oppressed weeds of the Summit | SummitDaily.com
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Summit Up 7-16-10: Standing up for oppressed weeds of the Summit

by Summit Up

Good morning and welcome to Summit Up, the world’s only daily column that would like to speak on behalf of the weeds. Consider the weed: just another of Mother Nature’s creatures, doing its best to survive in a harsh world. Thinking of, say, the Bulgarian Wort-flax Thistlestink, who’s to say that its dun-colored petals with their signature swastika-shaped blotches are any worse looking than, say, the delightful columbine. Beauty, as they say, is in the eye of the beholder, and if you’re, say, a woodland troll, an ogre of some sort or perhaps a wicked witch, you probably enjoy a spray of Bulgarian Wort-flax Thistlestink on your kitchen table a lot more than ugly ol’ columbine.

Who is it, we wonder, who decides which daisies are weeds and which are, y’know, just daisies? We can’t tell the difference. And think what a better place this would be if, instead of dumping 700,000 acre feet of pesticides on those plants we’ve termed “weeds,” we just accepted them as they are – just as we people like to be accepted regardless of our appearance?

(cue inspirational music/choir of angels)

We believe it’s time to cast off the ugly term “weed” and simply call them all plants. Let them live and let live (whatever that means). Besides, if there’s one thing we love about weeds, it’s how green they make our thumbs look. In the photo on this page, you can see a most excellent weed that grew at our home in Frisco with absolutely no additional water, plant food, fertilizer, mulch, or any of that stuff. We’re not even sure how this thing found dirt to grow in, there in this crack in our walkway. And perhaps it’s not the most beautiful plant in the world, but it bears a slight resemblance to the noble aspen, does it not? There’s no discounting the fact that this is an underprivileged plant that’s had none of the advantages of those pampered flowers our neighbors fuss over all the time. This plant is a fighter, by golly, and we admire its indomitable spirit and celebrate its Americanism – pulling itself up by its bootstraps, as it were, and rising to the lofty height of a good 24 inches even in the face of no pampering and an ongoing barrage of cusses from us as we pass by it, contemplating the day when we get off our butts some Saturday morning and get out the garden shears to chop it down.

Other than our name of Bulgarian Wort-flax Thistlestink, we don’t know what this weed is actually called (if you know, shoot us an e-mail over here at

summitup@summitdaily.com), but we call it Ned the Neglected, and now we’re not sure we’re ever going to chop it down.

Unless, of course, we find out Ned is some sort of “noxious” weed that will cause our house to tip over or something. Then, the Bulgarian Wort-flax Thistlestink is outta here.

***

OK, we have a big Smarty Pants Alert! going out today to Jeremy Vinyard-Houx. Here’s the skinny:

“The friends and family of Jeremy Vinyard-Houx would like to congratulate Jeremy on his recent graduation from Denver University with a Bachelor of Arts in International Relations and a Bachelor of Science in Geography this past June. Jeremy, a 2006 graduate of Summit High School, (actually Jeremy spent all of his schooling here in Summit County as a resident of Frisco, from Summit County Preschool to Frisco Elementary and Summit Middle and High Schools) graduated Magna Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa and received the Geography Merit Award as outstanding graduate. Jeremy has accepted a position in Denver with the USGS and is continuing his studies at the graduate level with Penn State University in the Geospatial Intelligence Program.”

Awesome! Nice list of accomplishments there, Jeremy. Congratulations on all of that and good luck at the USGS.

***

Gotta run. Happy Friday!


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