Survey already says what Frisco residents want | SummitDaily.com

Survey already says what Frisco residents want

Mike McCraken, Frisco

Congratulations to the majority of Frisco’s voters who voted “No” to Home Depot. Contrary to the Summit Daily News’ editorial opinion and advice to vote “Yes,” doing so would have put Frisco in an untenable negotiating position with Home Depot.Any owner of property is a potential seller. A potential seller’s strongest negotiating position is: 1) when owner doesn’t need to sell; 2) when owner doesn’t want to sell; but 3) when owner has several parties wanting to buy. Conversely, a seller’s weakest negotiating position is: 1) when seller needs to sell, as the Town would have us believe; 2) when seller wants to sell, as would have been the case had the yes votes prevailed; and 3) when seller has only one potential buyer, as in Home Depot (exclusively).Certainly, Home Depot realized the above as evidenced by their token (read paltry) offerings to the Town of Frisco. By comparison, Maryland Creek Ranch, with far less upside profit potential than Home Depot, made far greater concessions/commitments to Silverthorne for annexation into that town.Secondly, I believe the 57 percent “No” vote validates the findings of Frisco’s 9.4-acre telephone survey of April 2005. Those findings were paid for, but conveniently ignored, by the town. The most notable findings of that survey were: 1) Frisco’s majority of Frisco voters didn’t/don’t want Home Depot; 2) a larger majority support Colorado Mountain College (CMC) on the 9.4-acre parcel; and 3) locating CMC on the parcel is probably the most intensive use of the parcel that Frisco’s voters will support.There is reason to believe that CMC opted off the 9.4-acre parcel solely due to it being such a political “hot potato.” That “potato” is much cooler now and should be reconsidered seriously.