The Legacy Workshop comes to Summit County | SummitDaily.com
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The Legacy Workshop comes to Summit County

Explore the importance of your personal memories and gain assistance in selecting those aspects of your life that you wish to preserve and pass on at The Legacy Workshop on Thursday, July 24, from 2:30-4:30 p.m. at the Summit County Community and Senior Center.Guided by examples and exercises, participants will be introduced to varied methods used to recreate experiences into tangible and meaningful touchstones for yourself and future generations.The Legacy Workshop will be facilitated by Susan Toys, MA. Susan has been a licensed professional counselor and marriage and family therapist for the past fifteen years. She is a workshop provider and former English teacher.The Legacy Workshop is free and open to the public. Weekly follow-up Legacy memoir creation meetings will be offered for interested participants.For more information, call Susan at (970) 468-8035 or e-mail her at Toys4susan@yahoo.com, or contact Beth at the Summit County Community and Senior Center at (970)668-4115.Services for abuse survivorsSUMMIT COUNTY – WINGS Foundation provides support services for men and women who were sexually abused as children and educational presentations on childhood sexual abuse and its impact on adults. WINGS Foundation works to break the cycle and heal the wounds of childhood sexual abuse by providing education, support services and advocacy to adults throughout Colorado.For more information contact the WINGS office at (303) 238-8660 or at 1-800-373-8671, or visit our Web site at http://www.wingsfound.orgRed, White & Blueanswers the call for helpBRECKENRIDGE – The wildfire season in Colorado was in full swing Friday when the Breckenridge Fire Department was called. The dispatch center in Grand Junction was asking for a wildland fire crew to help fight the Brush Mountain fire, located 17 miles northwest of DeBeque near Grand Junction.At the time of the call, the fire had grown to more than 2,200 acres and had the potential to grow much larger.The assignment for the Breckenridge crew is for up to two weeks with the possibility of a crew swap to extend services to the end of the summer. According to the Red, White & Blue, these assignments provide some excellent benefits to the local departments.First, the firefighters get experience and training that would otherwise be unavailable to them in Summit County. This experience – will be invaluable if a significant wildfire ever strikes here.Secondly, the income made by the departments during these assignments allows them to purchase and maintain wildland fire equipment.Big band soundsblow through BreckenridgeBRECKENRIDGE -Today at 7 p.m. the town of Breckenridge presents the fifth in its Kidz Calliope series with a trio of talented vocalists. Pink Champagne will perform music from the nostalgic era of big bands and swing.These singers capture audiences and transport them back to a more innocent time when melody, lyrics and vocal harmony brought people out on the dance floor, swinging to the music of Glenn Miller, Cole Porter and the Andrews Sisters.For more than a decade, Pink Champagne has delighted audiences worldwide, toured the South Pacific with the Department of Defense and appeared with Bob Hope, the Air Force Falconaires Band and the Jefferson Symphony Orchestra.Tickets are $5, with group rates of $4 for 10 or more. For tickets, call the Riverwalk Center Box Office at (970) 547-3100, or visit http://www.townofbreckenridge.com and select Riverwalk Center.Chip sealing underwayacross county roadsSUMMIT COUNTY – The sections of tiny rock appearing along portions of roads in Summit County are part of a county maintenance project to seal up the surface of the existing asphalt, according to County Road and Bridge Director John Polhemus.The rock is part of what’s called a “chip seal,” where three-eighths inch rock is poured on tar over the asphalt surface. After the concoction has had time to settle, county street sweepers come along and clean up whatever rock hasn’t glued itself to the asphalt.The technique helps keep moisture from seeping into the road and extends the life of the asphalt, Polhemus said.Chip sealing under wayacross county roadsSUMMIT COUNTY – The sections of tiny rock appearing along portions of roads in Summit County are part of a county maintenance project to seal up the surface of the existing asphalt, according to County Road and Bridge Director John Polhemus.The rock is part of what’s called a “chip seal,” where three-eighths inch rock is poured on tar over the asphalt surface. After the concoction has had time to settle, county street sweepers come along and clean up whatever rock hasn’t glued itself to the asphalt.The technique helps keep moisture from seeping into the road and extends the life of the asphalt, Polhemus said.The county plans to chip seal about three miles of county road throughout the summer. Plans to work on County Road 30 toward Heeney, if they are completed during August as scheduled, would add another 10 miles to the total. The chip seal costs about $1.29 per square yard.


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