This is a war about regulation | SummitDaily.com
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This is a war about regulation

Kevin SpellmanBreckenridge

How can the conflict in Iraq be subdued? The answer is not military in nature; the answer has to do with capitalism. Establishing a military foothold in the Middle East in general, and Iraq specifically, was the first step toward securing the shared interests inherent to globalization. To undo that step in favor of withdrawal would dictate that the sacrifices of so many Americans and others were for nothing. We must look forward and decide what is needed as the Second Step to subdue not only the conflict in Iraq, but in many other places around the world as well. There are two sides to the current geopolitical landscape: developed and developing nations. Utilizing a concept from Allen Ginsberg’s poem Hadda Been Playing On The Jukebox: capitalism is the vortex of the rage focused against developed nations and is consequently responsible for, among other things, the events of 9/11. Developed nations have demonstrated to developing nations an articulated reluctance for policing their corporate entities, operating both inside of developing nations and inside their own borders. This illustrates to developing nations that there is an inherent element of corruption involved with capitalism.It is corruption rather than a particular nation-state that defines the “axis of evil” for the 21st century. Corruption is an option often selected by corporations in their pursuit of profit. Corporations cannot be faulted for their attempts to maximize profit while minimizing cost. This concept is a cornerstone of capitalism. The responsibility rests with established democracies to protect fledgling democracies from the “axis of corruption” by enforcing their own laws and regulations on corporate entities, regardless of where they are operating.The enemy of corporations is competition; victory over that enemy is monopoly. Monopolies cause inflation and inefficiencies, which in turn create misappropriations of resources and ultimately cause a significant portion of the population within an economy to become worse off. Corporations must be regulated to keep them from naturally gravitating toward monopolistic competition. Two options to consider when constructing a proper Second Step would be to 1) remove Paul Wolfowitz from the presidency of the World Bank and 2) create a sustainable infrastructure of Iraqi national corporations and Iraqi national corporate officers. The World Bank is responsible for providing large sums of capital intended for infrastructure projects occurring in Iraq and other developing nations. Paul Wolfowitz has direct and intimate ties with specific American engineering and financial firms. The World Bank issues capital to developing nations that accept bids only from American firms. These actions sustain current monopolies and suppress competition (especially budding firms within the developing nations themselves). If competition were allowed to flourish, it would allow for a more equitable distribution of the World Bank’s resources and a more progressive form of globalization. Creating a sustainable infrastructure of Iraqi national corporations involves the distribution and arrangement of development contracts. Every non-Iraqi corporate entity that receives a contract must employ a certain percentage of Iraqi labor at all levels of operation, including management. This percentage would increase incrementally over the life of the contract, phasing out non-Iraqi labor and establishing a sustainable foundation of national employment at all levels up to and including chief executive officers. Capitalism is the essence of the Second Step. We must offer as many pieces of the global pie to as many as possible. When individuals work together in pursuit of profit they tend to transcend ethnic, religious, and ideological boundaries. Make no mistake; what I have discussed in this letter would involve very difficult choices for many of our citizens given the state of politics in our nation today. American citizens have to decide whether to support politicians who cater to the lobbies of the corporations or those who understand that a progressive form of globalization creates security for all by establishing an equitable and peaceful geopolitical landscape.Make no mistake; what I have discussed in this letter would involve very difficult choices for many of our citizens given the state of politics in our nation today. American citizens have to decide whether to support politicians who cater to the lobbies of the corporations or those who understand that a progressive form of globalization creates security for all by establishing an equitable and peaceful geopolitical landscape.


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