This Week in History: Climax Molybdenum Planning Mill of 1,000 ton capacity | SummitDaily.com

This Week in History: Climax Molybdenum Planning Mill of 1,000 ton capacity

Complied by the Breckenridge Heritage Alliance
This Week in History

Lake Dillon, as seen from Ptarmigan Mountain in the fall. Summit County, Colorado. Ten Mile Range and Breckenridge ski area are in the background.

This week in history as reported by the Summit County Journal 100 years ago.

H.L. Brown, consulting engineer for the Climax Molybdenum company, was in town this week and stated that the original intention of increasing the size of the milling plant at Climax to a 500 ton capacity has been changed and the plant will now be arranged to handle 1,000 tons every twenty- four hours. That means an increase of four times the present capacity. The mill has been in preparation for four months and success has attended the operations. It has proven that a steady market is being made for concentrates, and while it is not the bonanza that was first expected, the demand for molybdenum will increase from time to time.

The Fourth at Black Creek

For the past few years, the residents of the Lower Blue have always gathered for a large picnic on the Fourth and spent the day around Black creek in the evening, later attending a big dance at the Blue Valley Hall. This picnic has come to mean more each year, and every Fourth has added many more visitors than the previous year. Residents of Grand county have come to look forward to this gathering, and many people from Breckenridge, Dillon and other towns of the county have gone there in the past.

*

A party consisting of Mr. and Mrs. E.E. Miller and Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Miller journeyed to Denver via the Miller auto, Wednesday morning. It is understood Lawrence is making every effort to get into the aviation corps of the army or navy.

Recommended Stories For You

Must Restock Streams

Local disciples of Isaac Walton who have been out this season, unanimously report fishing very poor. With little attention being given to the stocking of the streams above town and the trout being unable to come up the Blue and the dredges, the result is that very few fish are to be had for the trouble necessary to secure them. With a little attention given to the restocking of the streams in Summit county by local people, the Upper Blue might soon become a fisherman's paradise.

Breckenridge Boys in France

News from the front this past week tells of the arrival of several former Breckenridge boys in France. In every case they tell of the fine trip and safe handling, and that they are enjoying their experience. Among those to report as arriving at the front are J.C. Beattle, formerly shift boss at Wellington mill until the forepart of May when he was called in the draft from one of the Denver districts. Another former Breckenridge boy to get to France, is Lieut. Eugene Bond, who was assistant district attorney under Barney L. Whatley. Word was received this week that he had arrived safely in France.

The Breckenridge Heritage Alliance is a nonprofit founded to promote and protect Breckenridge's unique heritage. The organization offers year-round guided tours and hikes. Go to BreckHeritage.com or call 970-453-9767.