This week in history, July 31, 1920: Boy Scouts head out for the week, man’s hat shot in dispute | SummitDaily.com
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This week in history, July 31, 1920: Boy Scouts head out for the week, man’s hat shot in dispute

Compiled by the Breckenridge Heritage Alliance
As seen in The Summit County Journal July 31, 1920: an operation, which has been pronounced without parallel, has just been performed by Dr. Orlando F. Scott of Chicago upon himself and his wife. As a result of an automobile accident some weeks ago, Mrs. Scott's leg was fractured in five places and skin poisoning developed. Doctor Scott removed 12 square inches of flesh from his right thigh and transferred it to his wife's leg to save it from amputation.
Image from Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection

This week in history as reported by The Summit County Journal the week of July 31, 1920.

BOY SCOUTS LEFT TUESDAY MORNING FOR AN OUTING

The Breckenridge troop of Boy Scouts lined up in front of G.A.R. hall Tuesday morning and after having their pictures taken loaded themselves with fishing, tackle into several waiting automobiles and left with Scoutmaster M.J. Tillet, and an assistant for Slate Creek where they will camp, fish and have a glorious good out-door time for the remainder of the week.

J. B. TRIJLLO TAKES SHOT AT JOHN S. TRIJLLO

A quarrel between two of the sheep herders in charge of the sheep near Dillon last Monday resulted in J. B. Trijllo shooting at John S. Trijllo. The shot fortunately passed through John’s hat. Although of the same name, the two men are not related. John’s face was quite badly burned from the powder smoke — the shot being so close to the face.

The injured man came to Breckenridge for treatment last Tuesday and Sheriff Detwiler went out to look for the other man. They caught him near Argentine Pass Wednesday and brought him to the Breckenridge jail the same evening. Upon a hearing the next morning he was released on a $500 bond until the meeting of the district court, which convenes August 13.

GOVERNMENT SCUTTLES GOLD MINING INDUSTRY

The government is selling gold for industrial and manufacturing purposes at pre-war prices and killing the gold mining industry.

Gold production in our country has declined from $101 million in 1915 to estimated $40 million this year.

OUR MINING INDUSTRY

The mining industry is battling for existence right now and everyone interested in its welfare should work tooth and nail for its prosperity. The West should be a unit for the gold bonus and every other law favorable to the miner. Congress should be made to realize that the miner is a real factor in the advancement of the nation.

METHODIST SUNDAY SCHOOL PICNIC ON WEDNESDAY

The picnic given by the Methodist Sunday school on Wednesday was attended by about seventy-five people. The day was an ideal one, and enjoyed to the full. Games followed in quick succession.

Miss Nora Blake recited with great charm a quaint Scotch dialect poem, and Mrs. Wade recited “My First Music Lesson,” which was most amusing.

COLORADO SOLDIERS

The bodies of 400 Colorado boys who were killed in action or who died in the military or naval service overseas will be brought to Denver and Colorado for burial within the next six months.

LOCAL NEWS NOTES FROM ALL AROUND SUMMIT COUNTY

The eldest daughter of Ed Keller is reported to have the measles.

J. M. Thomas of Montezuma is in Denver this week, having gone there to attend the Democratic convention.

Mr. Shook, caretaker at Cataract Lake was taken very ill and Dr. Condon was called down to see him. He was taken to Colorado Springs on Wednesday, Mr. Hamilton taking him over in his car. He is reported as improving and expects to be back the first week in August.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Karhoff, of Denver, and other old-time Breckenridge residents, were here for several days this week meeting some of their old friends. Mr. Karhoff was in business here in the early days, having come here in 1866. They left in 1872.


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