This week in history: Date is set for Mask Ball | SummitDaily.com
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This week in history: Date is set for Mask Ball

Compiled by the Breckenridge Heritage Alliance
The coaling station at Cristobal, Panama Canal Zone, one of the largest in existence. Part of the coal is stored under water. Coal can be loaded here at the rate of 1,000 tons an hour.
Archive image

This week in history as reported by the Summit County Journal the week of April 10, 1920.

FRIDAY IS SET AS DATE FOR MASK BALL EVENT

For 35 years, the Mask Ball has been the event of the spring season, and this year it promises to eclipse all previous events. Electrician McQueen and Henry Reene have promised to work on some novelty effects for the evening, and the crowd is assured of one surprise after another from the grand march, which will be held promptly at 9 o’clock, until the last dance, which will be as late in the morning as the crowd will want to stay.

OIL DISCOVERY REPORTED AT DEBEQUE

Intense excitement was created in Grand Junction and DeBeque when it was reported that the Sterling Oil company, a Texas corporation, has encountered an oil sand west of DeBeque in the Grand Valley.

The sand was encountered at 2,100 feet and oil is reported to have risen 40 feet i the hole when drilling was suspended to await tankage. With the tank set up, drilling will be resumed and thorough testing done.

MRS. DIMPLE DIES OF HEART TROUBLE AT HANSON’S CAMP

Mrs. E. Dimple, who came up from Denver the last week in March to cook for Hanson’s the camp in North Swan died Easter Sunday shortly after dinner. The men returning from work in the evening found the dinner dishes still upon the table and believing that the cook was sleeping waited until about 7 o’clock. When Mr. Hanson returned to camp from Breckenridge, he tried to awaken the cook but found her dead.

A few days after reaching the camp Mrs. Dimple complained of her heart troubling her. The deceased was about 45 years old and has three sons and two daughters. One son, Paul Marriott, is expected to arrive from Seattle today to take charge of the body.

FOUND HIS OCCUPATION GONE

Women don’t feed tramps readily nowadays, with work so plentiful and men so badly needed in almost all occupations, and a tramp has to be a bit brighter than formerly with his excuses if he “gets by” the average housewife with a hard-luck tale. One that came to the back door of a Muncie, Ind. residence the other day will not fail to make good in his particular “profession” anywhere.

“I’m out of work,” he explained to Mrs. Housewife, as she stood frowning down on him, “because the war destroyed the only occupation I ever had been taught.”

“What was your job the war ended?” asked Mrs. Housewife.

“Tramping, mum,” was the almost tearful reply (from the Indianapolis News).

DON’T WHINE IN SICK ROOM

Every one is called upon now and then to visit the sick room. Conditions surrounding the bedside visitations present a wide variation. There is one rule that holds good under all conditions, and that is to carry cheer and sunshine — not a long face, but a smile. If the patients are able to talk to them of what is going on outside. Help them to forget themselves (From Thrift Magazine).


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