This week in history: Wellington Mines resume operations | SummitDaily.com

This week in history: Wellington Mines resume operations

Compiled by the Breckenridge Heritage Alliance

This week in history as reported by the Summit County Journal the week of January 3, 1920.

WELLINGTON NOW IN FULL OPERATION

The falling price of spelter (a zinc alloy) early in the year caused the Wellington Mines company, Summit county’s greatest producer of zinc blend ores, to cease production in March with something like 4,000 tons of good grade zinc ore of concentrates on hand.

During the last three months with zinc, or spelter, quoted at above $7 per hundred pounds, the 4,000 tons of zinc blend concentrates on hand at the time of closing the two concentration mills have been marketed. The wet concentration mill was started up a couple of weeks ago and the dry, or magnetic, mill will probably be running by the time this appears in print.


WARRIOR’S MARK COMPANY HAS RE-OPENED OLD-TIME BONANZA

Realizing that the upward trend of the price of silver had come to stay, Samuel Klous of Boston, looking over the silver ore mines of Breckenridge, decided that the Warrior’s Mark mine, which is credited with producing $96,000 worth of silver ore in the early “eighties” with the adjoining silver lode mines combined with it would make a great silver producing property.

JESSIE MINE PREPARES FOR BIG DEVELOPMENT WORK IN EARLY SPRING

The Jessie Mine on Discovery hill in Gold Run, which passed into the control of George F. Roth and associates about three years ago, is again to be actively operated.

GOLD BOND A HEAVY SILVER PRODUCER

The Gold Bond Exploration company, whose property is situated on a spur of Mount Guyot, shipped several carloads of good grade silver ore during the summer and had two carloads of ore ready to haul when a snow slide blocked the road.

THE MONTEZUMA AND TEN MILE DISTRICTS PROMISE TO BECOME GREAT PRODUCERS OF SILVER

The first discovery of silver ore in Colorado, by Prospector Cooley in 1863, was made close to the present town of Montezuma in Summit county. In those early days of silver mining Swansea, England, was the best, and for many sections the only place where silver could be commercially separated from the lead ores with which it was associated.

William E. “Pussyfoot” Johnson, American prohibition worker and organizer of the Antisaloon League, has lost his right eye. He was injured November 13 when dragged from a platform by English students.
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