This week in Summit County history: ‘General Winter makes a surprise attack hereabouts’ | SummitDaily.com

This week in Summit County history: ‘General Winter makes a surprise attack hereabouts’

Compiled by Breckenridge Heritage Alliance
This Week In History

This week in history as reported by the Summit County Journal 100 years ago, the week of Oct. 20.

The Journal last week grew poetic over our Indian summer. The eulogy was written in the nick of time, for this week a description of the weather abhors poesy. The situation is decidedly prosaic.

Behind a barrage of huge snowflakes that formed a white blanket 4 inches deep, General Winter moved into our valley on Wednesday and temperature of only four degrees above zero that night and a temperature even lower than that Thursday night indicated that he intended to hold his ground for awhile and repulse all counter attacks attempted by Old Sol.

The non-combatant population was taken by surprise, and there was a sudden rush to the woodpiles and coal bins. Also there was a stampede for rubber goods and overcoats. Thursday night the deserted streets indicated that most people were still in ice-proof cellars.

Local Masons make merry at a fish fry and social

Breckenridge Lodge No. 47, A.F. & A.M. on Thursday evening were the proud hosts of their wives, friends and members of the Order of the Eastern Star, the occasion being a trout banquet.

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W.G. Downing of Marysville, California, who has been a constant visitor at the lodge and chapter this summer, donated the "speckled beauties" to which was added every accessory necessary to a perfect whole in the way of a feast. And such a feast! About one hundred gathered around the beautifully decorated tables and gave ample evidence of their appreciation of the good things spread thereon.

Town burns; 1,000 sheep poisoned

Five hundred of a flock of 5,000 sheep belonging to Harold Chambers of Hartzell (sic) were dead in the pens Saturday morning when the herders entered to care for them. During the day about 500 more died, and the evidence is that the animals were poisoned. Saturday night, after working all day, the flock masters believed they had overcome the epidemic and will be able to save the others.

Friday night, Alma, a small mining town near here, was almost destroyed by fire. Two weeks ago the haystacks at a ranch near this city were burned by fire from a cigarette, and the owner believes the intent was to destroy his hay and farm buildings. These three losses are blamed upon a coterie I.W. W. here, especially as the owner of the farm property believes he has traced the destruction of his hay to one of them.

Must register birth of war babies

Dr. Eric E. Kennedy, of the State Board of Health, has issued an announcement that it is imperative that the births of all children whose mothers desire to receive full benefits of the new insurance law for dependents of soldiers, recently passed by Congress, be properly registered.

Santa Fe engine explodes

Three men were instantly killed and two injured when a giant Mikado engine of the Santa Fe railroad, hauling a freight train south of Denver blew up the Orsa block house, 27 miles south of Denver throwing wreckage over a radius of 700 feet and causing big property damage. Lack of water in the boiler caused the terrific explosion, railroad men agree.

The Breckenridge Heritage Alliance is a nonprofit founded to promote and protect Breckenridge's unique heritage. The organization offers year-round guided tours and hikes. Go to breckheritage.com or call 970-453-9767.