Top 5 most-read stories last week: Death of a Snowy Peaks teacher, Kents found not guilty and Uptown 240 cranes set for removal | SummitDaily.com
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Top 5 most-read stories last week: Death of a Snowy Peaks teacher, Kents found not guilty and Uptown 240 cranes set for removal

A crane towering over the Uptown 240 work site is expected to be removed Thursday while the developer works on securing funding to complete the project.
Libby Stanford/Summit Daily News archive

Stories in this list received the most page views on SummitDaily.com in the past week.

1. Snowy Peaks mourns death of teacher following accident Friday

Greg Bachman, a Snowy Peaks teacher, died following a bicycle accident in Kansas Friday, June 3, according to a Summit School District statement released June 4. 

Snowy Peaks Principal Jim Smith shared his condolences on behalf of the district. 



“Our hearts are broken. Greg was a revered member of the Yeti family. His time at Snowy Peaks was defined by his commitment to our students and families, and Greg served as an invaluable colleague to the Yeti staff,” Smith wrote in a statement. “He will forever be missed.”

Bachman is the husband of Summit Cove Elementary Principal Crystal Miller, the school district shared in a statement.



— Staff report

2. Deputy takes 41 impaired drivers off the roads in Summit County

The Mothers Against Drunk Driving and the Colorado Department of Transportation awarded Summit County Sheriff’s Office Patrol Deputy Andrew Hinman recognition for his service.

Hinman started his law enforcement career with the Summit County Sheriff’s Office in January of this year. Hinman has stopped 41 impaired drivers.

Per the Colorado Department of Transportation, approximately one-third of traffic fatalities involve an impaired driver in Colorado.

— Luke Vidic

3. Kents found not guilty on all counts alleging abuse of corpse, tampering with deceased body

A Clear Creek County jury found former funeral home owners Shannon and Staci Kent not guilty on all counts. 

Victor Akubuo’s body was reported abandoned at Kents’ Silverthorne funeral home in February 2021. A subsequent investigation led to felony charges of abuse of corpse and tampering with a deceased human body filed against the Kents.

Akubuo died in a single motor vehicle crash July 30, 2020. His body was taken to the Park County Coroner’s Office for identification and an autopsy. When provided with a list of nearby funeral homes, Akubuo’s next-of-kin selected the Bailey Kent Funeral Home in Silverthorne on Aug. 11.

The verdict comes after three attempts at the case were stifled by two mistrials.

— Luke Vidic

4. Uptown 240 plans for crane removal Thursday as developer works on project financing

The crane towering above Uptown 240’s foundation will come down June 9, according to Dillon Town Manager Nathan Johnson.

Uptown 240 owner Danilo Ottoborgo said the subcontracted RMS Cranes needed its crane at another project. He described the removal as temporary while Uptown 240 finalizes its financing. Once financing is received and construction begins, he said a new crane would be brought in.

Development on the planned 80-unit luxury condominium development in downtown Dillon has been stalled since developers lost funding at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Uptown 240 project began when the Ottoborgo family demolished its family restaurant to build the luxury housing project.

— Luke Vidic

5. Breckenridge’s Buy-Down Program puts 8 deed-restricted properties up for sale to help workforce housing

Eight homes bought through Breckenridge’s Buy-Down Program are currently for sale through the Summit County Housing Authority. 

All of the homes are in the Upper Blue River Basin and are priced between $388,000 to $620,000 and will be sold by a lottery for workers in Summit County. Home sizes range from studio to three bedrooms. 

In Breckenridge’s Buy-Down Program, housing officials purchase homes for sale, place a local workforce restriction on the property and sell the home at a reduced price. For all of the homes, the property must be the occupant’s primary residence, and each home has a restrictive covenant where the occupant must work 30 hours per week on an annual average basis for a business located in and serving Summit County.

To purchase a property that is deed-restricted, buyers need to qualify through the Summit County Housing Authority.

— Eliza Noe


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