Top 5 stories on SummitDaily.com, week of Feb. 24 | SummitDaily.com

Top 5 stories on SummitDaily.com, week of Feb. 24

$2.8 million single-family home at 1025 Four O’Clock Road in Breckenridge.
Hugh Carey / hcarey@summitdaily.com

Editor’s note: Stories in this list received the most page views on SummitDaily.com for the past week.

1. Breckenridge hostel tops January’s real estate sales in Summit County

The Bivvi Hostel in Breckenridge was January’s most expensive real estate transaction in Summit County, selling for 4.38 million. In property records, the assessor’s office listed The Bivvi as a single-family home with a bed-and-breakfast, but the company that sold it, Slifer Smith & Frampton Real Estate, promoted the listing as a unique opportunity to own a high-end mountain lodge with 11 bedrooms and 11.5 bathrooms. A woman at the hostel said guests shouldn’t notice any difference, as the same business model and management team remain in place at the hostel. A typically low-volume month for Summit County’s real estate, January featured 29 transactions worth over $1 million based on property records, which include all transactions.

2. Construction worker dies following heart failure, fall off scaffolding in Frisco

A 44-year-old construction worker from Aurora died on the job in Frisco last week following an apparent cardiac event and fall from the third floor scaffolding. Jamie Garcia Manriquez was working at an in-the-works townhome development known as the Estates on Galena when the incident occurred. When officers arrived they found Manriquez laying on his back with his head up against the east side of the building on the snow. A construction worker at the site told police Manriquez was working on the third story atop a pump jack, a common type of scaffolding used in residential construction, when he fell off and hit the ground.. Manriquez was transported to St. Anthony Summit Medical Center where he passed away. The Summit County Coroner’s Office believes that the fall was not the cause of Manriquez’s death. Instead, the office flagged the cause of death as heart failure due to cardiac disease, and cited the manner of death as natural, according to preliminary autopsy results.

3. Video: Breckenridge couple reveals gender of baby in true Summit County fashion — on skis

In some feel good news this week, a Breckenridge couple announced the gender of their baby as only mountain dwellers would do — by letting off colored smoke bombs while skiing down Hoosier Pass. Friends of Greg and Amanda Day created the video after the creative gender reveal party, and we decided to share it on our site after getting a little choked up — even while watching it for the eighth time. Was it blue or pink smoke? You’ll have to watch the video to discover the gender of Baby Day.

4. Aspen men skied through avalanche debris before deadly slide, report says

Two Aspen-area men who died in an avalanche near Crested Butte on Feb. 16 skied through debris of two recent slides in Brush Creek Valley shortly before triggering one themselves, according to a report by the Colorado Avalanche Information Center. Owen Green, 27, of Aspen, and Michael Goerne, 37, of Carbondale, “skied past four avalanches and crossed over the debris of two slides before reaching the slope they triggered,” the report said. “They had to break trail through the large accumulation of dense snow and wind drifts left by the recently multi-day storm.” CAIC rated avalanche conditions for the Gunnison zone as “considerable” on Feb. 16, down from “high” the day before.

5. Town of Breckenridge aims to buy U.S. Bank building to complement new parking garage

Breckenridge town officials are working on a deal to purchase the Breckenridge Professional Building as part of efforts to build the long-awaited parking garage on the South Gondola Lot. The building sits sandwiched between town hall to the east and another town-owned parcel to the west, with the back of the property up against the South Gondola Lot. While the town isn’t planning to demo the building or kick anyone out, it does want to obtain parking easements right next door to the future garage, as the property will almost certainly play a critical role in pedestrian access to the structure and downtown walkability. A resolution passed unanimously Tuesday night by Breckenridge Town Council instructs town staff to do everything in their power to negotiate a mutually beneficial deal to buy the property. Should the town and landowner be unable to reach such an agreement, the resolution authorizes the town to begin the proceedings to seize the property.

Social Calls

Social Calls are comments taken from the Summit Daily’s website and Facebook page.

“Slippery slope people! Very slippery slope!” — Adam Caswell on “State lawmakers push to allow temporary removal of guns from high-risk individuals”

“And who makes these decisions of who can and cannot have a gun? Careful what you pass Colorado.” — Kaccy Montague on “State lawmakers push to allow temporary removal of guns from high-risk individuals”

“If you are of sound mind then you have nothing to worry about. If you are high-risk then it’s better for you and the people around you.” — Jenny Levasseur on “State lawmakers push to allow temporary removal of guns from high-risk individuals”

“So much for due process of the law and civil rights.” — Robert Michael on “State lawmakers push to allow temporary removal of guns from high-risk individuals”

“Why just temporary? What good will just 365 days do?” — Judith Holler Dessoffy on “State lawmakers push to allow temporary removal of guns from high-risk individuals”

“As long as they make a plaque for Scoop’s old office and let KSMT stay, it’s OK, I guess…” — Scott Howard on “Town of Breckenridge aims to buy U.S. Bank building to complement new parking garage”

“You know what I do to avoid the traffic? I ski on weekdays” — Tom Smalley on “Colorado faces meager budget in fight against ski traffic”

“The traffic has become unbearable. Visitors will skip Summit County for easier ski towns — Crested Butte, Steamboat, even Telluride. Or … take their spending to Wyoming, Montana or Utah.” — Annmarie Neal on “Colorado faces meager budget in fight against ski traffic”

“This is the 4th season we’ve skipped out on buying passes. I grew up in summit county but we rarely go up anymore to see my folks/ski because I refuse to sit in traffic with a bunch of crazy drivers. It has gotten worse and will only continue to get worse.” — Emily Elise on “Colorado faces meager budget in fight against ski traffic”

“I love Bustang. Happy to pay more, but then what about people who need the low fares? Now arriving at Rock and Hard Place.” — Paul ZLewis on “Bustang popularity continues to climb in Colorado as driver shortage intensifies”

“$16 an hour with 51 lives at stake? No wonder no one wants to job.” — Rick Ish on “Bustang popularity continues to climb in Colorado as driver shortage intensifies”

“It’s almost like they didn’t plan on Bustang being popular. Capping wages and reducing service would seem to be a great way to hurt that popularity, too. Does that last thing in the Denver Post article mean there might be an 18 year old CDL driver paid $16/hr driving the bus? I might pass it up then…” — Erik Hamilton on “Bustang popularity continues to climb in Colorado as driver shortage intensifies”

“Every other ski town has managed to develop while preserving character and charm. Not sure why it is so difficult for Summit County to do the same.” — Annmarie Neal on “Frisco hopes to balance growth and character in developing community plan”


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