Vets hike Hoosier Pass for wilderness | SummitDaily.com

Vets hike Hoosier Pass for wilderness

Alli Langley
alangley@summitdaily.com

Veterans and their families are invited to explore the newly proposed Continental Divide Wilderness Area with Garett Reppenhagen of the Vet Voice Foundation.

The group will meet atop Hooser Pass at 9 a.m. on Saturday, July 25, for a moderate, 5-mile loop hike starting just below treeline and rising to about 13,000 feet.

The ridgeline hike will offer participants views of areas proposed for federal wilderness protection by U.S. Rep. Jared Polis. Polis’ mountain representative and Summit County resident Nissa Erickson will join to help hikers learn more about the conservation effort.

Participants will meet by the Continental Divide sign at the Hoosier Pass parking lot 11 miles south of Breckenridge on Highway 9. They should bring water, lunch/snacks and sunscreen and be prepared for potentially cold and wet weather. Children who are capable hikers are welcome, but dogs should be left at home.

RSVP to Garett Reppenhagen, U.S. Army 1st Infantry Division OIF veteran and Vet Voice Foundation Rocky Mountain West coordinator, at 719-235-7030 or REPP@vetvoicefoundation.org.

Latino group promotes water conservation in Denver

Nuestro Río will celebrate its annual Colorado River Day festivities on July 25 in downtown Denver, part of a region-wide movement to honor the waterway that serves as the backbone of the West’s economy and a critical drinking source for millions.

Colorado River Day 2015 marks the 94th anniversary of the day the Colorado River was officially renamed from the Grand to the Colorado. Denver will be one of several Western cities hosting celebratory activities and a day of action focusing on the critical need for states’ leadership to manage increasing demands for Colorado River water.

For years, the entire Colorado River system has struggled with serious water management problems, with more water taken out of the river than flows in. A variety of factors have accelerated the imbalance, including climate change and record drought.

The July 25 celebration in Denver focuses on the positive urban conservation measures included in the developing Colorado Water Plan and the need for Colorado state leaders to do more. Governors in all basin states must lead the way to better manage the limited water that is available in the Colorado River basin by quickly implementing a range of bold solutions that start with conservation and efficiency.

The event will be from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Sunken Gardens Park (800 N. Delaware St.) and will feature live music and mariachis, mariachis, food, and speakers including government representatives and members of the Nuestro Río Youth Caucus.

Latino youth from five Southwest states are meeting July 23-25 in Denver to learn about serving their communities by raising awareness about the importance of protecting and preserving the Colorado River and its tributaries.

The 25-member group, aged 16 to 24, will learn how to make effective presentations at conferences, talk with their peers and decision-makers, and share their ideas for creating efficient, effective, common-sense solutions with national and state policymakers.

Nuestro Río, a network of Latinos in the West, is working to educate elected officials and youth about the ways Latinos are connected to the Colorado River and help them to become advocates for a healthy river for future generations.

Celebrate public lands at Wildfest in Snowmass

A celebration of surrounding public lands, Wildfest is designed to bring outdoor enthusiasts of all interests and backgrounds together for a day of family-friendly fun.

The event, hosted by Colorado conservation organization the Wilderness Workshop, offers live music, workshops, activities, panel discussions and locally-produced cuisine, beer and spirits from 1 p.m. to 11 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 1.

More than 500 people are expected at the Other Side Ranch at 5459 E. Sopris Creek Road in Snowmass.

Activities, workshops and discussions include wilderness yoga, ethical foraging, paleo primitive skills, hoop instruction and decorating, mural painting and “Humans and Nature: How Do We Co-exist?”

Tickets cost $30 in advance and $35 at the venue, and kids 12 and under are free. Parking costs $10 and is free for cars of four or more people. Tickets are available online at http://www.wildernessworkshop.org/wildfest or for retail purchase mountain sports shops in Carbondale, Aspen and El Jebel.

Wilderness Workshop is also accepting volunteer applications. Volunteers can submit their information online or by calling Reghan Mahaffey at (970) 274-4314.

For more information, contact Wilderness Workshop at (970) 963-3977 or visit wildernessworkshop.org.


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