Vona: Cyclist’s actions on recpath ‘unacceptable’ | SummitDaily.com

Vona: Cyclist’s actions on recpath ‘unacceptable’

Jennifer Vona
Frisco

My husband and I were heading up to Zach’s Stop on Aug. 22 at 5 p.m. for a little hike to Rainbow Lake with our pooch Pilot. We were stopped on the gravel road by a tourist mother and her 5-year-old son. They were lost, and needed some help understanding the layout of Frisco and how to get safely back to the marina. As we stood there (on the gravel road) and they (on the bike path) passing along info about the town, a man heading south on the recpath, clad in white sneakers, white socks, nylon blue thigh length shorts and cotton T-shirt, unapologetically yelled at the lost tourists. And for what, exactly? Because their presence in the bike path made him apply the brakes for two seconds to slow to a manageable speed when using a multi-purpose path at a busy intersection? Move his handlebars two inches to the left or right to avoid the lost tourists? It was embarrassing to be a part of the Summit County community and see such blatant disrespect.

As a competitive cyclist, I have been there. Working hard on a interval piece, pushing the limits of my mental ability and to have to slow, re-direct, stop, etc is no doubt frustrating, but that’s why I don’t do those workouts on the multipurpose trail. I realize that the path is for fun, cruising, enjoying the beauty of the mountains in a safe environment, away from the traffic. What this individual did on the path was unacceptable, and truly, if you intend to use the path for anything other than an enjoyable ride in the mountains, one must be prepared to handle traffic on the recpath, appropriately. Yelling at someone, who is rightfully enjoying his/her day of riding, but who happens to impede your progress, is not, and will never be appropriate.

I have no doubt these types of encounters are frequent, and really, shouldn’t the town do something with the high volume areas? Perhaps some red painted lines to indicate slower speeds and caution is required. Something that indicates, visually, that you are entering a heavy traffic use area – with children, pets, people, cars, blind egresses and even wildlife. It seems pathetic that conscientious people can’t step up and do their part to share, but perhaps humankind isn’t so kind afterall.