We asked Breckenridge Town Council candidates about supporting the local workforce, including minimum wage, housing and child care. Here’s what they had to say | SummitDaily.com

We asked Breckenridge Town Council candidates about supporting the local workforce, including minimum wage, housing and child care. Here’s what they had to say

Do you support setting a local minimum wage? 

I remember an article awhile back where a person was complaining that her job at McDonald’s earning less than $15 an hour was not enough on which to live. The response was that McDonald’s jobs were intended to be part-time jobs for students to earn a little extra money. I believe many jobs here in Summit that pay minimum wage are jobs like that. I’m confident that most employers with “real jobs” already pay wages above the minimum. They do so to attract and retain quality employees. If individuals want higher pay, they should take their education, talent and skills and find the job that best utilizes those skills. If those skills are useful, I can almost guarantee that job will pay above minimum wage.

— Hal Vatcher 

I am a long-time advocate for livable wages. According to the Center for Women’s Welfare, the 2020 Self-Sufficiency Standard wage in Summit County for a single adult is $14.47 per hour. This means a single person needs to earn at least $14.47 per hour to cover housing, health care, transportation and a low-cost food plan. For a single adult with a school-age child, it is $26.01 per hour. This wage number covers only the basics and does not include payment of any debt, retirement savings or even the cost of bikes or other recreation. An informal survey of local employers and employees found many jobs in town already start in that $14-$15 an hour range. While true for some, we need to assure all wages support the ability to live, work and play in our community. I would work with community stakeholders to ensure legislation serves the interest of the people while minimizing unintended consequences. Salaries for tipped employees must be dealt with in a fair and equitable way, and any wage legislation must be sustainable and meet the goals driving the legislation. Learn more about the Self-Sufficiency Standard at SelfSufficiencyStandard.org.

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— Jennifer McAtamney

No, that isn’t the answer to the problem, as the difficulty is finding a generation of ski enthusiasts who desire to work in the ski and service industry. For example, doing domestically what they do within the program that Vail Resorts has in existence for those with J-1 visas.

— Michael Cavanaugh

I do not under the current state statute allowing municipalities to set minimum wage. I have, however, been to the state Capital to lobby our legislators to make a couple of changes to the statute, including a fixed tipped wage set at the state’s prevailing tipped wage and to clean up language allowing a Home Rule Town (which Breckenridge is) to set minimum wage. There is confidence by the sponsoring legislators that these fixes will pass this session. When that happens, I will support setting a higher local minimum wage. 

— Dick Carleton

Increasing the minimum wage lifts people out of poverty, helps low-income families make ends meet and narrows the gap between the rich and poor. It is also argued that increasing the minimum wage hurts small businesses, squeezes profit margins, leads to inflation, encourages employers to downsize their staff and increases the cost of goods to the end consumer.

How do we balance these two needs? Most local employers pay more than $15 per hour today. Those who do not, often provide other benefits such as ski passes, recreation center passes and subsidized housing.  

While setting a local minimum wage across the county makes sense, I propose we look at the total compensation package that employers provide their employees, including wages, health care, housing and other benefits. Wages is only one element of total compensation. Locally, I would like to see a minimum compensation of $17.50 per hour. Employers would be able to take credit for wages, tips, incentives, health care, allowances and subsidized housing.      

— Emily Wahl

The town of Breckenridge’s vision and the goals of the Destination Management Plan, as created by members of the community, plainly state that people who work in Breckenridge should have an opportunity to live in Breckenridge. I support this vision as it meets the needs of our residents while providing the best and most unique experience for our visitors.

There is no single way to address livability for employees in our community, but the town has invested in keeping employees here by supporting workforce housing, the Peak Health Alliance and the child care assistance program. Despite these efforts, the cost of living continues to rise faster than the level of pay, and we are losing quality workforce necessary to maintain a good experience for locals and guests. Additionally, because more and more workers have to commute in, we’re exacerbating traffic and parking issues.

I support continuing to work toward setting a higher local minimum wage than what is set at the state level. I am hopeful that efforts at the state level correct the issues for tipped employees so that wage increase can directly benefit the lowest wage workers. 

— Kelly Owens

Once the state addresses the discrepancy of the tip-credit for tipped employees verse the untipped wage earners (which has to be done at the state level) I will support setting local minimum wage.

— Jeffrey Bergeron

I believe in community livability, and I support a minimum wage. I hear $15 used as a minimum wage, but I’m not convinced without more information that it is enough for an individual to live in this community. Housing, child care and groceries are necessities. I believe our workforce has a right to live in the community they serve. We have the facts and the research that proves raising the minimum wage strengthens the local economy, puts additional funds back into our town and kick-starts a positive cycle of greater demand for goods and services, job retention and employee productivity. It is a far more positive experience to live in a town with a significant percentage of permanent full-time residents rather than a town that mainly comprises transient workers with little to no attachment to the community. 

— Dennis Kuhn

I support local efforts to help keep living in Breckenridge sustainable and would support a minimum wage increase as part of a countywide initiative, but I am not actively pursuing an increase because the ripple effects are not fully vetted at this time. 

— Kristen Stewart

Do you think short-term rentals should be taxed at a higher rate than residential homes? 

Commercial properties pay a higher tax rate than residential proprieties in Colorado because the property’s income is considered. For short-term rentals, they’re used as an income-generating property but taxed at the lower residential rate. Because of this, I feel they are closer to a commercial enterprise than a residential one. However, the state has decided not to change it at this time.

I believe short-term rentals have benefitted the economy of our town, but the impacts to housing supply, cost of living and crowding require ongoing consideration and potentially mitigation. In lieu of a large state property tax change, I would support exploring mechanisms to collect taxes based on the annual income generated by a short-term rental. A tax would be voted on by the community. The funds generated could be used to support programs that keep employees in town. This would also create more equity with lodging businesses. For example, the Fireside Inn pays a commercial tax on the rooms they rent out, but surrounding short-term rentals pay residential rates.

— Kelly Owens

This is not a question for Breckenridge Town Council. Property tax rates are set by the state Legislature. All commercial businesses pay commercial property taxes if they own the real estate their business occupies. I do and have for many years. If they rent, I can assure you their rent reflects the higher property taxes. So, the question for the state is, “When do short-term rentals become commercial businesses?” I believe the answer is at some point, they are commercial businesses, but I would need to hear from the public and talk to short-term rental businesses owners and the real estate community to try to find a collaborative answer to when short-term rentals become commercial businesses.

— Dick Carleton

Visitors who use short-term residential rentals as an alternative to traditional hotels enjoy cost savings. Short-term rentals have an advantage over traditional lodging as they do not have to provide the same level of service or safety and are not subject to the same taxes and fees of commercial business.  

There are valid concerns raised by the increase of short-term rentals in Breckenridge. There are reports of noise, utilities usage, parking and trash. Short-term rentals contribute to the decline in available and affordable housing for the folks who live and work locally. The fact is that an investor can make more money renting properties out by the day than by the month or year. 

The 24-hour hotline has been a big help in alleviating some of the immediate problems.

Breckenridge should explore ways for short-term rental properties to pay for their impact on our infrastructure: trash, water, sanitation and electric usage. We should implement parking space requirements based on occupancy.  

The long-term solution is bigger than Breckenridge. At a state and county level, work needs to continue to explore ways to level the playing field between the hotel industry and properties available for short- and long-term rental.

— Emily Wahl

Yes I do. Though I don’t think it should four times the residential rate as was proposed by the state. But I do think it could be higher to mitigate the impact on the town caused by short-term rentals. But to be clear, that tax increase was proposed by the state of Colorado and not the town of Breckenridge.

— Jeffrey Bergeron

Yes, especially in the commercial district.

— Michael Cavanaugh

This is a complicated question due to constitutional amendments passed by Colorado voters, and the Breckenridge Town Council has no power to legislate this.  Property taxes are set by the Gallagher Amendment. In 2019, this required owners of commercial properties to pay property tax at about four times the rate of residential properties. It is this inequity along with our current crisis in long-term rentals that has brought this question to the forefront. When a local or second-home owner rents out their property when they are away, I do not view this as a true commercial enterprise. These one-off rentals are also not the cause of our long-term rental crisis. The tipping point is the trend to purchase multiple properties and essentially run a boutique hotel. Since the Town Council does not have the ability to impact this inequity, I would work on the Housing Committee to develop incentives to convert these new short-term rentals back to long-term housing for our workforce. Buy-down’s and the Housing Helps program are great examples of creative thinking and efficient use of public funds to address our workforce rental needs.

— Jennifer McAtamney

The short answer is yes. The reason for this is that with rental property ownership comes responsibility. Short-term rentals produce higher profits than long-term rentals. Short-term rentals also place a higher burden on our town’s infrastructure, such as garbage removal, parking, snow removal and law enforcement. A very small additional percentage of the profit a short-term rental generates should support all the services used by the same rental. However, we should not be in a hurry to add taxes before we thoroughly research the most appropriate incremental increase based on usage. Additionally, a complaint hotline exists to simplify complaints associated with short-term rentals to ensure that the property owner or a responsible agent will respond to complaints within 60 minutes. The goal is to create an environment where being a good neighbor is valued by all of us. 

— Dennis Kuhn

I support the spirit of and conversation around the recent Colorado Senate Bill 20-109 to look at how Colorado can mitigate the negative impacts of short-term lodging. However, I believe there needs to be balance between regulation to address local housing needs and potential government overreach that could have negative effects on our local real estate business and the real estate transfer tax, a vital revenue source for our local government. 

— Kristen Stewart

The short answer is that all short-term rentals should be taxed at the same rate. I was previously under the mistaken understanding that rentals through local property-management companies were taxed at a higher rate. That is not the case.

Short-term rentals are already paying more taxes than a normal residential home. Rental properties must be licensed by the town (taxed). Short-term rental properties must pay “occupancy” taxes. Residences do not.

Short-term rentals have been a mainstay of Breckenridge forever. Historically, most properties were managed and rented through local property-management companies. These agencies are licensed by the town and appropriate “occupancy taxes” are being collected and paid.

Much of the “noise” around short-term rentals has come about as organizations such as VRBO and Airbnb evolved, and individuals started to rent out rooms or their properties themselves. Often these rentals (now businesses) were not licensed and appropriate taxes were not being collected.

Through new rules and regulations put in place by our town, most short-term rentals are now licensed, and appropriate taxes are being collected and paid.

We should not raise taxes.

— Hal Vatcher

Should the town build more workforce housing or focus on incentivizing homeowners to convert short-term rentals to long-term rentals?

My first choice would be the town incentivizing owners to long-term rent along with emphasizing programs (like Breck buy-back) that create long-terms rentals for perpetuity. I support the town building workforce housing but at a slower pace. 

— Jeffrey Bergeron

Both and more. We still need around 1,000 additional workforce housing units to adequately house our current workforce.  We do not have the land or money to build this many units, so we need to focus on a multifaceted approach to ease our workforce housing issues. We need to continue to buy units (buy-downs), deed restrict them to be workforce housing in perpetuity and then sell them to a member of the workforce. As we roll out our new Housing Helps program, we should fund it adequately to seize all opportunities before us. To build more units, we should be looking for public-private opportunities, which we just did out on the McCain Property, as well as ways to incentivize the private sector to build workforce housing on its own. We need to generate as much housing as possible in the Upper Blue Basin, allowing our workforce to live and work in the Upper Blue and become community members here. This is critical to the character and spirit of Breckenridge. 

— Dick Carleton

This isn’t an either-or issue. An 1,100-unit shortage of attainable housing will not be solved with just one tool. I support the ongoing work of town staff to continue to analyze what’s working for other communities, what’s not and what modifications might make it work for Breckenridge. This constant evaluation and reevaluation, along with out-of-the-box ideas have helped help keep our workforce local. We don’t have enough land to eliminate the housing shortage in the Upper Blue, and the increase in density would likely come with some unintended consequences. But programs such as buy-downs and incentives, when combined with careful planning and construction of new units, feel like a reasonable approach to keep pace.

— Kelly Owens

Breckenridge, and more broadly Summit County, needs to fully understand our current demographics and the projections for the next five to seven years in order to create a long-range plan that addresses workforce housing needs. 

Yes, the town should be doing both, build workforce housing and incentivize converting short-term rentals to long-term rentals. This is a complex issue that requires working the problem from many angles. The Housing Helps program is a good idea that avoids the high cost of building. This program needs to be expanded while being carefully evaluated for efficiency and effectiveness. Additionally, we should pilot programs that provide an accessory dwelling unit within single-family units as flexible workforce housing to offset building needs. Workforce housing is a complex, long-term need that is going to require planning and execution across multiple alternatives.

We need to accurately assess what types and price ranges of dwellings are needed (rental, dormitories, duplexes, single-family homes). Then look at current inventory, define the gap, and partner with major employers and developers to look at innovative solutions. 

— Emily Wahl

Considering the fact, we do not have enough land to build our way out of the housing crisis, our work on housing should never be a single-pronged approach. In my first two terms, I spent seven years on the Housing and Childcare Committee followed by three years on town staff considering the issues impacting locals every day. During that time, we built a strategic housing plan, which the town has been executing ever since, and serves as a resource for other mountain communities tackling this complex issue. If elected, I would continue this proactive approach and use all the tools available to tackle this problem. This could include buy-downs, Housing Helps, incentivizing conversion from short-term rentals, land banking, private-public partnerships and even building our own as we did with Valley Brook and Blue 52. I would serve on the Housing Committee, where I will put my experience to work to build creative programs and preserve the feel of community that is so important to our way of life. 

— Jennifer McAtamney

We cannot build housing fast enough to solve the problem. Housing is a critical aspect of livability. We need to continue with a two-step approach. 

1: Continue to build workforce housing.

2: Continue the Housing Helps program, which offers incentives to deed restrict properties. Additionally, we should continue to look at what other successful mountain towns are doing in terms of housing solutions and remain open to incorporating new ideas and programs. 

— Dennis Kuhn

With a documented need for an additional 1,000-plus units, we need to pursue every avenue available to close the gap. Affordable housing is key to being able to hire and retain a workforce to keep this town operating.

We should look to implement workforce housing programs that better fit the model of many of our employees. We have a lot of people who come here to work for the winter or the summer. Perhaps even part of a season. Employee housing should also be offered for periods of three to six months. In other words, flex the lease terms to meet the needs of the individuals.

We should implement more or better incentives for business owners to buy/rent housing for their employees. Perhaps a model where a business rents an apartment (at low rates) but can “assign” the unit to their employee(s) for short or long periods, as needed. The business owner would be responsible for the rent and general upkeep and will probably furnish the unit. The business owner would charge the employee the appropriate rent, likely even lower than the town rates as further incentive to keep quality employees. This style program takes the responsibility off the town while giving the employer and employees the ability to create a housing model that fits what they really need.

— Hal Vatcher 

No, I don’t believe there should be any more workforce housing because it gets manipulated and only the wealthy can afford it. Instead, we should focus on property tax incentives for homeowners to convert short-term rentals to long-term rentals.

— Michael Cavanaugh

The town is and has already done both. I support their approach of looking at multiple ways to solve the issue of workforce housing. At the recent State of the Town event, council indicated incentives are the most cost-effective options right now, and the town is testing and implementing some helpful and new programs like Housing Helps and buy down programs. Socializing those options throughout the community will be a big step in seeing how effective they can be for locals to buy homes. I’d love to move the needle on securing seasonal workforce housing and more affordable apartments, specifically. 

— Kristen Stewart

How should the town address the lack of funding for child care?

This is an issue of top priority to our young families. I am aware that as soon as a couple is expecting, they put their names on all child care waitlists to ensure they have a spot somewhere. In the next few years, we need to explore the best ways to increase the number of spaces available and to make it affordable, the end goal being helping our families to stay in Breckenridge long term, raise their children here and become part of the permanent fabric of our town. 

— Dennis Kuhn

We currently don’t have a lack of funding for our child care assistance program. We are fully funded through 2023. It is, however, time to explore our options to secure sustainable funding into the future, which is what we discussed at a council meeting a month or so ago. The idea that was discussed at that meeting was to add up to a 1% excise tax on short-term rental sales, and we asked town staff to run some numbers on it. I do believe this is something we should explore, which will include looking at the numbers as well as talking to the short-term rental community. 

— Dick Carleton

I am on the board of Little Red Schoolhouse and attend the town’s child care committee meetings. The common theme is simple: Let’s do what’s best for the kids, and let’s support our community by providing high-quality, reliable child care so parents can continue to be high-quality, reliable employers and employees. I believe this theme can find universal support, and I intend to work to bring the community together to create a long-term funding solution everyone can get behind.

Last month, I supported the plan to study, with input from the community, a tax on short-term rental income. If the study shows this tax would be an appropriate action to take, the question would be put on the ballot for voters to make the final decision. If the study shows this option doesn’t seem the most effective, I would support finding a different way to create a long-term funding source. 

— Kelly Owens

First of all, I will say we do need a continued revenue stream to allow our families to both work and raise a family. (Again, keep Breck not just a resort but a community.) There have been many options discussed: VRBO tax, sales or property tax, business license tax. All of the above would have to be either passed or denied by the voters. Before I would support any of those (or any) options, I would ask first that we form an advisory working group comprising business owners, private residents, child care leaders and town staff to weigh in on what would be the most effective and least painful for locals that would be able to pass in a local election.

 — Jeffrey Bergeron

It’s my understanding the town’s tuition assistance scholarship program is funded through 2023, and officials are currently exploring long-term funding options, including a short-term lodging tax. Any proposed town tax would have to be voted on by Breckenridge residents, so that decision would be in the hands of voters, which I appreciate. I do believe this is one of the major areas we can help strengthen our community, and I am in favor of finding a longer-term funding option, especially if it had a public/private sector component. This is one of those local issues where I believe we could tap deeper into the knowledge and pioneering spirit of this community to see what else we could bring to the table to help support this important need.  

— Kristen Stewart

Lack of funding is only one of the problems that Breckenridge is facing as we try to provide available and affordable child care. Breckenridge needs to continue to support child care with alternative forms of funding and increase its efforts to solve all the roadblocks.

We need to step up to help with early childhood needs. Parents need support, assistance and education. The Family & Intercultural Resource Center does a great job providing home-visiting programs, and it needs town support and resources to expand its efforts and develop new initiatives. Compensation is one of the key drivers of quality. We need to improve compensation for early-childhood educators so that they earn an equitable salary. Current salaries make attracting and retaining a qualified workforce difficult.

We have lost many in-home child care facilities over the past several years. Let’s find ways to encourage local residents to provide this child care option.

A child’s first 1,000 days are crucial in building a foundation for successful later education. Early educators need a deep knowledge of child development. We should consider partnering with Colorado Mountain College to offer early childhood certification programs to increase the expertise and the pool of qualified educators.  

— Emily Wahl

Today, the Breckenridge Child Care Program, like many town programs — e.g., recreation, art, history and even plowing — are funded through the annual budget process at the discretion of the Breckenridge Town Council. For the past 13 years, the Town Council has approved this funding, and while the current dedicated funds dwindle in 2024, the Town Council could continue to fund it at their discretion. This approach works with the broad community support for this successful program. Now, to secure permanent funding and the future of the program, we need the voters to approve a tax to fund it. I spent seven years on council and almost three years as town staff working with our schools and local families, using data to streamline and strengthen this program. I have looked long and hard at the impacts of this incredible program. As it currently stands, I would not go to the polls without doing additional research. Our community, the employers and families cannot afford to have this measure fail. Any ballot measure proposed needs a strategic and deliberate approach to assure the proposed measure provides adequate funds and is backed by strong community support. 

— Jennifer McAtamney

The town has sufficient funding in the 2019 budget for child care but seems not open to the potential and present operators who are available.

— Michael Cavanaugh 

I stated this earlier: I was quite surprised to hear that we do not have a funding source for child care (subsidies) beyond 2022. Affordable child care, like affordable housing, is a key driver to attracting and maintaining our workforce. To learn that our town does not already have a plan in place to maintain this “top three” critical program is very concerning.

We seem to easily find monies for various projects. For example, it cost $2 million for lockers in the ice rink. That could have funded two or more years of child care! Wouldn’t that have been a better place to use that money?

We are such an affluent town. We seem to have plenty of money available. We have “buckets” where various monies get allocated. I believe we can move some of the money from one of these “buckets” to support of a long-term child care program.

— Hal Vatcher 

What do you think is the biggest problem facing Breckenridge today?

Sustainability on all fronts: sustaining our local character, vibrancy and livability; pioneering sustainable environmental efforts to better care for the place we live and play; and sustaining the most important thing we have: each other.  

I may sound like a Pollyanna, but I have been cheering this town on from the sidelines for many years because I love it so much. My passion is almost annoying to some, naive to others but so real in my daily life! I want to serve this town, not just because of the beautiful life we have here — one that so many visit annually to try and experience — but because of our community, my friends, neighbors and the opportunity to have a real impact on someone’s life for the better. That’s truly what I’m running for, and I hope you will vote for me April 7.

— Kristen Stewart

From a global standpoint, I think it’s climate change, and I feel we are working hard on a local level to do our part to address this, but we will need to continue this work and do more. From a local standpoint, we are in danger of (some think we already have) losing the character of the town and the quality of life of our residents. I believe I addressed my approach to this in my priorities, but it will take a council with the courage to make extremely difficult decisions and to work very hard on many fronts. I am asking our community to vote for me so that I can continue to do this work.

— Dick Carleton

We must ensure that Breckenridge preserves and enhances its small-town feel and the sense of place an authentic Colorado mountain town offers. As a Colorado native, I grew up spending time in our mountain towns and have witnessed enormous growth throughout the state.

The Destination Management Plan provides us with a solid framework for working toward maintaining our authenticity as a Colorado mountain town while balancing a thriving economy and livability. I support the ongoing work staff is doing to reach goals outlined in that plan and look forward to elevating our focus on developing new strategies to meet those goals over the next four years.

As a mom and scientist, I’m proud that our community is primed to lead the way in sustainability. I firmly believe that leading the way on community preservation and sustainability requires us to think big. Our adoption of the Climate Action Plan in 2019 and our support of the sustainable building code shows some of those big plans. The biggest work is yet to come, and I look forward to working with this great community to continue be leaders in sustainability.

— Kelly Owens

Our infrastructure cannot accommodate the amount of folks who visit. We need to be thoughtful in terms of marketing as well as what, when, who and where we allow or encourage events to occur. 

— Jeffrey Bergeron

Breckenridge is in the fortunate position of being a successful destination resort. We now have the enviable task of dealing with the issues that a prosperous town has. We have rapidly increasing property values, traffic congestion, housing issues and the local feeling that we are bursting at the seams. Many struggling small mountain towns would like to have our problems. The largest task ahead is how to resolve our challenges while keeping the spirit of our town and the small-town sense of community that has been drawing people to live and play here for decades. 

— Dennis Kuhn

The big issue is managing growth, sometimes called smart growth, because growth impacts everything. The town has done a good job on developing goals for smart growth. These goals include plans in multiple areas: local workforce housing, affordable quality child care, sustainability of the environment, parking and transportation, and community engagement. These interrelated issues can be solved by working together to find creative solutions.

The foundation for smart growth rests on four pillars: a vision, a development plan, regulations and processes. Our town has set specific goals that touch on many of these areas. This past Town Council and the Breckenridge Tourism Office have set four smart growth goals: deliver a balanced, year-round economy; elevate and fiercely protect our town’s authentic character; more boots and bikes, less cars; and establishing Breckenridge at the leading edge in mountain environmental stewardship and sustainable practice. Each of the goals has supporting action plans.

We now need to carry them out by verifying that we are holding true, being financially responsible, managing development and preserving the character of our town.  

— Emily Wahl

Today, a potential economic downturn caused by a pandemic would take priority. When that passes, our biggest problem continues to be preserving our community. It is under siege with the influx of people to Denver and our proximity to the Front Range. The current trend in short-term rentals taking the place of long-term rentals is a sign of this struggle. Our housing crisis means shortages in workers, as it is increasingly hard to work here when housing is scare and ludicrously expensive. Without a focus on maintaining what makes Breckenridge special, we will kill the golden goose before we realize it. Quirky, real, authentic and friendly are all adjectives that visitors say brought them here the first time and had them coming back again. We must work diligently to maintain this authenticity, ensuring we do not lose the essence of our community. Tactically, this means working with the Breckenridge Tourism Office to manage our destination and deal with congestion, proactively addressing the need for housing and child care, supporting countywide efforts to address mental health and taking a leadership role to turn the tide on climate change so we don’t endanger the very thing that drives our economy.  

— Jennifer McAtamney

Overcrowding on more and more days each year. We used to say we had 20 or so “bad days” a year. I believe that number is more like 50-75 now. It’s difficult to move around almost every weekend, winter or summer.

Our town exists based on tourist spending. Since we came out of the last recession, our town income has grown substantially every year. One might say, “Our success is killing us!”

More and more people are moving to Colorado, and 50,000-80,000 more people are moving to the Front Range each year. These people want a place to play. With world-class skiing, biking, hiking, etc., Breckenridge is considered a great destination.

One might consider the congestion on Interstate 70 to be a blessing to us. It’s a natural throttle that helps control the flow into Breckenridge. Perhaps we should not be looking for I-70 solutions!

There is no silver bullet to address this issue. As our consultants said a few years ago, we must use a silver shotgun, including satellite parking, better/safer ways to walk around town and roundabouts, to name a few. These can help.

— Hal Vatcher 

The town of Breckenridge has a major problem coordinating and time-spacing the extensive growth amenities that are being created.

— Michael Cavanaugh


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