Weed of the week: CHAMOMILE | SummitDaily.com

Weed of the week: CHAMOMILE

Lisa Taylor
weed management coordinator

Small populations of chamomile can be controlled by simply hand pulling, while larger infestations should be dealt with by treating with an approved herbicide.

– Imported from Europe as an ornamental;

– A bushy annual that produces up to 1 million seeds;

– Can grow up to 3 feet tall with showy 12 pedaled white flowers;

– Grows in disturbed soil;

– First weed to appear in Summit County in the spring and continues to flower throughout the summer;

– Both Scentless and Mayweed grow in Summit County. To distinguish between the two, smash the stem between the fingers, Mayweed will have an odor, Scentless will not;

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– Established throughout the high country;

– Seeds stay viable for up to 6 years;

Small populations of chamomile can be controlled by simply hand pulling, while larger infestations should be dealt with by treating with an approved herbicide. Please remember that when using herbicides always read and follow the label. Control before the plant goes to seed.

If hand pulling, be sure to bag the plants up and dispose of to the landfill. This is one of the first plants you will see coming up in the spring. Since the plant is an annual, more than one crop per year will grow, but with persistence you will gain the upper hand on it.

Chamomile loves disturbed sites, thus revegetation is critical in controlling this plant.

Chamomile causes blistering in the mussels of wildlife, thus they cannot utilize it for forage. Do not confuse this chamomile for the kind used for making tea, it will cause blistering in the mouth and throat.

For more information about this plant or any of the other weeds in Summit County, visit our website at http://co.summit.co.us. For information on where treatments are being preformed, call the recorded information line at (970)-668-4252.