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Letter to the Editor: I worry that incorporation won’t serve Keystone’s community

Tanya Becker
Montezuma

I have experienced the drama and histrionic behavior of Keystone residents, both from full-time home owners as well as second-home owners.

In the years that I have lived in this county, I have come to believe that Keystone is managed and that its path forward is determined by wealthy realtors and developers as well as the home owner associations. 

The mean age of the charter commission candidates is 58, and several candidates are over 70. The mean age of Keystone residents is 30. My fear of incorporation is that Keystone will become a retirement community with such people seeking control. I fear that those younger residents will not have a voice, and this commission will ultimately rule in its own best interests.



Keystone is a resort destination. Individuals come to ski, hike bike. It is not a gated community. It is not a senior citizen community. It is a vibrant resort established for the enjoyment of tourists and locals of all ages. And with that, comes the need for housing and lodging. For entertainment. For dining. For outdoor experiences.

With that comes cars and buses and traffic. If we did not have this young population that swings the chairs, sells the tickets, serves the food and drinks, sells the gear and apparel, we would have no Keystone.



Rather than incorporation, I wish the Summit County and the Commissioners would have had a chance to listen seriously to the concerns of Keystone residents — all residents — and work together with them so that it could have ensured that this community along with its needs and solutions were represented by all who live and work here.


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