Flitcraft: A veteran no longer proud of country he defended (letter) | SummitDaily.com

Flitcraft: A veteran no longer proud of country he defended (letter)

Upon accepting my commission in the U.S. Army 60 years ago, I swore to the following oath: “I do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God.”

I am proud of my service but am no longer proud of the nation I defended for nearly three decades. We the People have elected representatives who swore to the same oath I did before entering their respective offices but have come to believe — despite their oath — that technological advances have rendered the Constitution obsolete. They have led our nation toward an administrative form of government that prescribes our every day activities, requires a permit for us to deviate and is accountable to no one. They have established bureaucracies that require us to comply with a growing list of regulations and mandates, causing the people to become dependent upon the government to provide food, shelter, safety, diet, initiative, health care and child care using public funds outside the scope of the Constitution. To pay for this largesse, we have accumulated an $18 trillion debt and have reduced our freedom to choose our own livelihood.

It is hypocrisy to pretend that our nation remains as it was designed, as we do when we celebrate our independence on July Fourth and thank those who fought to keep it on Veterans Day. It compounds the hypocrisy when we elect representatives who swear to, then ignore, their oaths of office. They invite a tyranny worse than the one from which we revolted two centuries ago.

We are trying to function with two mutually exclusive, irreconcilable systems of governing: self government versus an unelected administrative government. We had a similar experience 150 years ago: free states versus slave states. History tells us how that conflict was resolved.

Tony Flitcraft

Frisco


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