Liddick: Trump is the sand in the political machinery’s gears (column) |

Liddick: Trump is the sand in the political machinery’s gears (column)

Morgan Liddick
On Your Right

Once in a while, there's insight. Often, it's disappointing.

Take the current fools' carnival called the immigration debate. Once one understands the mechanisms and strategies at play in what was a crucial negotiation about national policy — before the distraction squirrel of "gun control" ran across the path of progress — disgust is about the most benign response. The ugly truth is, political leadership on neither the left nor the right wants a resolution to this conundrum. It's simply too valuable a tool to destroy by solving it.

Big business wants cheap unskilled labor and isn't fussy about how they get it. Well-heeled interest groups will support proposals which are guaranteed to fail and politicians who generate and carry them so they can claim the moral high ground of national security and sovereignty, while allowing employers access to a continually-refreshed pool of inexpensive and quiescent workers to keep their labor costs low.

Progressives want political power and aren't fussy about how they get it. If it means harboring a few thousand illegal resident criminals and turning a blind eye to their depredations on US citizens, so be it. There are votes in cultural pandering, not only from minorities but from Anglo voters who can be guilted into acquiescence. Well-heeled and choreographed mobs will "force" leftist politicians to propose solutions with no chance of being accepted, so that they may continue to claim the moral high ground of feelings and sympathy, reaping votes thereby.

Both political parties know the game. Both recognize the profit in it, so political leadership on both sides of the aisle have every interest in letting the party roll on as far as the eye can see. The only people whose interests are damaged are the illegal residents whose status might be improved by an agreement, and the average Americans whose livelihoods and occasionally, physical well-being, are threatened. But they don't count; the former mostly don't vote and the latter are just a bunch of deplorable rubes whose opinions should be ignored.

Enter Donald Trump, who threatens the corrupt and cozy favor-trading and mutual-interest-truckling that underpins this, and most other "controversies" in the Washington swamp.

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Want legalization for the "Dreamers?" Done. In fact, make 'em citizens, and in larger numbers than proposed by his predecessor. Want border security and an end to chain migration? Done. But, because of the past perfidy of one party in similar immigration "fixes," we'll do the latter first. Then the former. And there we are, an agreement the major components of which the American public supports by substantial margins. Its outline was visible for all to see after one hour of negotiation among House and Senate leaders and the President.

But our political masters have absolutely no interest in striking this deal, despite what was obvious to all us hoi poloi. Doing so would deprive both sides of a cause on which to agitate and fundraise; the only faction to benefit would be ordinary citizens who, absent this hardy-perennial crisis might be able to turn their attention to other serious threats. Like why we have to borrow a trillion dollars a year to enable the government to more efficiently take money from one group of Americans to give to another or tell us all how we should get our electricity or move about.

So the angst continues, fanned by the photogenic child soldiers, professional pot-stirrers and prevaricators of the political class, and their willing dupes in the media. Well-heeled financiers of left and right pour rivers of money into the conflict to wrest advantage for their narrow interests. It's a well-oiled machine and it's worked surprisingly well. Until Trump.

His common sense proposals on immigration and his willingness to make a deal beneficial not to specific small groups but to the long-term interests of the nation and its citizens, are a threat to the long-established Kabuki theatre that is immigration policy in Washington. Doubly so, since he is willing to accord both sides of the argument what they have long said they sought — provided that each side will agree that the other gets their desideratum as well. The refusal of which exposes both sides of our political class for the charlatans they are.

Because of this and other similar maneuvers, our political class has decided he must be marginalized and eliminated, by any means necessary. Our leaders, whatever their political stripe, have finally united: they hate Donald Trump more than they love the country. Because there are deplorable bumpkins to be stampeded and fleeced, and he gets in the way of this business as usual.

The question is, do we want the condescending and prevaricating business as usual to continue, or if not, what are we prepared to do about it?

Morgan Liddick writes a weekly column for the Summit Daily News.