Kayak season already flowing | SummitDaily.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Kayak season already flowing

BRYCE EVANS
summit daily news
Summit County, Colorado

FRISCO ” Peering through the door of Ten Mile Creek Kayaks on Thursday, store owner Matti Wade wasn’t too concerned about the precipitation pounding the pavement outside ” at least when it came to enjoying his favorite summer activity.

“You’re already in the water and going to get wet when you’re kayaking,” Wade said. “As long as it’s not too cold or windy, you’ll be fine.”

On days with Summit County’s usual sunshine, though, taking a boat down the river is more than “fine.” And as the winter’s snowpack continues to run into the area’s rivers, creeks and reservoirs, it’s already a good time to pull out the paddles and hop in a kayak.

“The season came a little sooner this year than last year,” Wade said. “We’ve been open since April 1, and there have been plenty of people boating already.”

Last year’s river season was one of the longest that Wade ever recalls, which means it’ll be tough to match this summer. Regardless, Wade still thinks conditions will be beneficial to paddlers.

“I think it might be a little early end, because there’s speculation right now that we’ve already had the peak on Ten Mile (Creek),” he said. ” … This was more of a normal snowpack (this winter). So in all speculative realms, I would guess it’ll be a little less of a season than last year, but last year was the longest ever on Ten Mile. It should still be a pretty long season.”

Wade has already been down the Ten Mile Creek, which his shop is located on at the west end of Main Street in Frisco. He said that he and fellow boaters have been working to clear debris from the creek all spring, and the water is in good condition to head down.

Anyone looking to paddle a river should consider their skill level, Wade said, especially considering the difficulty of streams in the area.

“That’s the one thing about our area here in Colorado, is that there’s not a lot of beginner and intermediate rivers,” he said. “Most of it, especially in Summit County, is advanced or expert.”

Ten Mile Creek, for example, has a difficult flow level and should only be attempted by advanced or expert boaters, Wade said. The same goes for the Snake River and Clear Creek. Any creeking, for that matter, should not be taken lightly.

“That’s for people that have their skills down,” Wade said. “It looks inviting to people that come to town and look, but it’s not for everyone. I’m very adamant about explaining that it’s a creeking situation.

” … Creeks are narrower and younger riverbeds, so the rocks are more jagged.”

Wade suggests that beginner or intermediate paddlers first try upper sections of the Colorado River before moving on to more challenging flows.

Also, Ten Mile Creek offers instructional lessons to people looking at getting into the sport or just trying to improve their skills. Wade and his staff provide what he calls “introduction to whitewater lessons,” where the instructor goes over everything from the equipment to paddle techniques to rolling ” all in the safety of non-flowing water.

The water, of course, is what Wade enjoys the most.

“I think of it like recycling because you’re paddling the same water you skied in the winter. You get to use it again, in a way,” he said. “It’s just about getting out there in nature and getting into the soulfullness of what the mountains are about. It’s all about water.”

As for the rain pouring of the gutters of his shop, Wade said it could be good or bad for conditions.

“Rain helps melt the snow, but it just depends what’s happening at 10, 11 and 12,000 feet,” he said. “If it’s snowing up there, it’s definitely a good thing.”

Bryce Evans can be reached at (970) 668-4634 or at bevans@summitdaily.com.FRISCO ” Peering through the door of Ten Mile Creek Kayaks on Thursday, store owner Matti Wade wasn’t too concerned about the precipitation pounding the pavement outside ” at least when it came to enjoying his favorite summer activity.

“You’re already in the water and going to get wet when you’re kayaking,” Wade said. “As long as it’s not too cold or windy, you’ll be fine.”

On days with Summit County’s usual sunshine, though, taking a boat down the river is more than “fine.” And as the winter’s snowpack continues to run into the area’s rivers, creeks and reservoirs, it’s already a good time to pull out the paddles and hop in a kayak.

“The season came a little sooner this year than last year,” Wade said. “We’ve been open since April 1, and there have been plenty of people boating already.”

Last year’s river season was one of the longest that Wade ever recalls, which means it’ll be tough to match this summer. Regardless, Wade still thinks conditions will be beneficial to paddlers.

“I think it might be a little early end, because there’s speculation right now that we’ve already had the peak on Ten Mile (Creek),” he said. ” … This was more of a normal snowpack (this winter). So in all speculative realms, I would guess it’ll be a little less of a season than last year, but last year was the longest ever on Ten Mile. It should still be a pretty long season.”

Wade has already been down the Ten Mile Creek, which his shop is located on at the west end of Main Street in Frisco. He said that he and fellow boaters have been working to clear debris from the creek all spring, and the water is in good condition to head down.

Anyone looking to paddle a river should consider their skill level, Wade said, especially considering the difficulty of streams in the area.

“That’s the one thing about our area here in Colorado, is that there’s not a lot of beginner and intermediate rivers,” he said. “Most of it, especially in Summit County, is advanced or expert.”

Ten Mile Creek, for example, has a difficult flow level and should only be attempted by advanced or expert boaters, Wade said. The same goes for the Snake River and Clear Creek. Any creeking, for that matter, should not be taken lightly.

“That’s for people that have their skills down,” Wade said. “It looks inviting to people that come to town and look, but it’s not for everyone. I’m very adamant about explaining that it’s a creeking situation.

” … Creeks are narrower and younger riverbeds, so the rocks are more jagged.”

Wade suggests that beginner or intermediate paddlers first try upper sections of the Colorado River before moving on to more challenging flows.

Also, Ten Mile Creek offers instructional lessons to people looking at getting into the sport or just trying to improve their skills. Wade and his staff provide what he calls “introduction to whitewater lessons,” where the instructor goes over everything from the equipment to paddle techniques to rolling ” all in the safety of non-flowing water.

The water, of course, is what Wade enjoys the most.

“I think of it like recycling because you’re paddling the same water you skied in the winter. You get to use it again, in a way,” he said. “It’s just about getting out there in nature and getting into the soulfullness of what the mountains are about. It’s all about water.”

As for the rain pouring of the gutters of his shop, Wade said it could be good or bad for conditions.

“Rain helps melt the snow, but it just depends what’s happening at 10, 11 and 12,000 feet,” he said. “If it’s snowing up there, it’s definitely a good thing.”

Bryce Evans can be reached at (970) 668-4634 or at bevans@summitdaily.com.


Support Local Journalism

Support Local Journalism

As a Summit Daily News reader, you make our work possible.

Now more than ever, your financial support is critical to help us keep our communities informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having on our residents and businesses. Every contribution, no matter the size, will make a difference.

Your donation will be used exclusively to support quality, local journalism.

For tax deductible donations, click here.
 

Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User