The Breakdown: What’s the point? | SummitDaily.com
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The Breakdown: What’s the point?

BRYCE EVANS
summit daily news
Summit County, Colorado
Sports editor Bryce Evans
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At no time have I ever claimed to be smart. Sure, I throw some words together every so often which (I hope) make sense, but that doesn’t mean things don’t confuse me once in a while – or a lot in a while.

For instance, I’m perplexed how LeBron James can talk about his elbow hurting, yet every time he’s shot a basketball, passed a basketball or blocked the crap out of a basketball in the past two weeks – you know, during the time his ‘bow went bad – he doesn’t show any ill effect of an injury. Well, that is until it’s a timeout or in warm ups. Then you can see him grimacing as if Shaq placed all his 340 pounds on LeBron’s left pinky toe.

Strange.



Even weirder is how he “doesn’t use it as an excuse,” as he’s proclaimed every time he goes on and on about how bad it hurts, how it affects his shooting, how it affects his ability to get to the basket and how it affects him mentally because he’s constantly thinking about it. I guess that directly identifying something as the reason that you may or may not fail isn’t saying it’s an excuse.

I don’t know.



Anyway, I think I strayed from my point here, and, yes, I do have a point that goes beyond poking fun at “King” James.

Or at least I did have a point before I started writing this. It was, um, I guess I lost it. Stay with me, though, I’m sure it’ll come back. I just need to knuckle down and …

Oh, speaking of knuckling down, here’s an interesting bit of news regarding the latest American signing of a Japanese pitcher. At only 18 years old, the player supposedly throws a wicked knuckleball, mean enough, some think, to eventually lead to a strong pro career. Did I mention the player’s a girl? Eri Yoshida, who just graduated high school in Japan, was announced at a news conference Friday as a signee to the Chico Outlaws, a California minor league squad in the independent Golden Baseball League.

Sure, she’s not the first female to play pro ball (the last to do it was Ila Borders in 1997), but the reason some think she may end up succeeding is the fact she throws the knuckleball rather than any strength pitches. She appeared in 10 games in the Arizona Winter League last season – a league in which many top major league prospects participate – and she went 1-1 with a 4.79 ERA for the Yuma Scorpions. Not bad. Actually, those are better stats than 98 percent of all relief pitchers for the Cubs the past five years. Maybe the Cubs should overpay her, too.

But that’s still straying from my original point, even though I’m not really sure anymore what that was.

I know I wanted to make sure not to mention Lawrence Taylor at all. I guess I just did, though. Ignore that. This is a family friendly column.

Family – that’s what it was; today’s Mother’s Day.

Now it’s all coming back to me. You see, the point of this column – that is, before I got distracted – was to talk about mothers and their overwhelming impact on their kids, especially when those kids end up playing sports.

In a sports obsessed family with all boys, my mom was always the balancing force when it came to competition. She was the level head that never let me or my brothers get too high or down on ourselves and our biggest supporter. (She also played referee quite a bit in terms of breaking up fights between me and my little brother – the brother whom I regularly forced into goalie pads and shot hundreds of pucks at every day.)

So, we got off topic a bit today, but look at all we learned: LeBron, besides being overly dramatic, is just fine; if you’re a girl who wants to pitch professionally, throw a knuckleball; and always remember how much your mom helped you out as a kid.

Well, I feel smarter now. Although, I don’t think this counts as one of those times where I made much sense.


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