Gas prices in Summit County continue to slide | SummitDaily.com
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Gas prices in Summit County continue to slide

A gas pump at an Exxon location on 10 Mile Drive shows regular unleaded gas costs nearly $4.60 on Aug. 3 around 4 p.m.
Andrew Maciejewski/Summit Daily News

Over the past several weeks, gas prices have stabilized below the $5 mark and decreased further since peaking earlier in the summer. 

In Summit County, AAA reported that gas prices are averaging $4.60 per gallon. That is a drop from late June, when the county was averaging about $5.08 for a gallon of gas.  

Colorado is tied for the largest weekly decrease in the country. Along with Kansas and Ohio, Colorado average gas prices dropped 22 cents, according to AAA.



As of Tuesday, Aug. 2, state prices averaged at about $4.36 per gallon for regular-grade gasoline. On Monday, Aug. 1, prices were at $4.40 for the state, and a month ago, regular gas cost about $4.89 per gallon.

Still, despite the drops, prices are higher than they were one year ago, when a regular gallon of gas in Colorado cost $3.56 per gallon. The national average, $4.21, is still over $1 more than it was a year ago. 



“Consumers appear to be taking the pressure off their wallets by fueling up less,” Andrew Gross, spokesperson for AAA, said, “and there’s reason to be cautiously optimistic that pump prices will continue to fall, particularly if the global price for oil does not spike. But the overall situation remains very volatile.”

Tim Robertson fills up his Toyota Tacoma at the Exxon gas station off of North Summit Boulevard in Frisco on Saturday, April 2, 2022. Though prices have decreased over the past several weeks, the national average price is still a dollar more than it was a year ago.
Andrew Maciejewski/Summit Daily News archive

New survey data from AAA showed that drivers are making significant changes to cope with record pump prices. According to the survey, 64% of drivers have changed their driving habits or lifestyle since March, with 23% making “major changes.”

Drivers’ top three changes to offset high gas prices are driving less, combining errands and reducing shopping or dining out. Others included postponing vacations and carpooling.

In March, AAA released an earlier survey which showed that $4 was the tipping point for most Americans to begin adjusting their lifestyles around higher gas prices. 

“We know that most American drivers have made significant changes in their driving habits to cope with high gas prices,” Gross added. “But with gas below $4 a gallon at nearly half of the gas stations around the country, it’s possible that gas demand could rise.”

According to data from the Colorado Department of Transportation, late spring and summer’s travel totals for the Eisenhower-Johnson Memorial Tunnel have been lower than they were in 2021.

This year, the months of April, May and June have had average daily totals of 30,834 vehicles, 29,310 vehicles and 36,883 vehicles, respectively. A year ago, traffic analyzers at the tunnels counted, on average, 31,382 vehicles per day in April, 29,380 vehicles in May and 39,916 vehicles in June. As of Aug. 2, CDOT had not released July 2022 data for the tunnels. 

At a July 12 council meeting, Breckenridge Tourism Office Director Lucy Kay said that Fourth of July weekend was down 14% compared to 2021, but overall, the summer is pretty much on par with last year.

In July, businesses in Summit County told the Summit Daily that they also noticed a slower-than-expected summer season. Some attributed that to gas, while others said they believed that 2021 was busier because more people were excited to take vacations post-pandemic.


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